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Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)
] >> that's what i'm talking about! >> whoo! >> steve wynn is the man with the midas touch who added glamour to the gambling industry. >> if you're gonna start a gambling joint, start a gambling joint. >> he transformed las vegas into an international tourist spot, but the odds haven't changed. >> the only way to win in a casino... >> is to own one. >> own one. >> unless you're very lucky. [stopwatch ticking] >> internet gaming is illegal in the united states and absolutely thriving. >> yes! >> right now, as you watch this story, 70,000 people are gambling on party poker, and that's just one site. >> there will be more online poker games per day at the end of this year than all of the casinos in the entire world put together. >> welcome to 60 minutes on cnbc. i'm steve kroft. by some estimates, gambling in this country is a nearly $100-billion industry. it attracts everyone from flamboyant businessmen to nefarious conmen. while the odds are heavily stacked against them, for millions of americans, gambling remains enormously popular, even in these hard economic times. in this episode, charlie
from perfume to children's toys, but which may also be causing birth defects. but first, steve kroft's story on the enormous amount of money being spent to treat people as they approach the end of their lives. how much money? well, in 2009, medicare paid $55 billion for doctor and hospital bills for patients as they approached the last two months of life. to give you some perspective, that's more than the budget for the department of homeland security or the department of education. and as we reported in 2009, most of those bills were paid for by the government with few or no questions asked and with an estimated 30% of the treatments having no meaningful impact. >> ms. klish, it's dr. byock. >> marcia klish is either being saved by medical technology or being prevented from dying a natural death. >> we're just here checking on you. >> she's been unconscious in the intensive care unit at dartmouth hitchcock medical center in lebanon, new hampshire, for the better part of a week. one of her doctors, ira byock, told us it costs up to $10,000 a day to maintain someone in the icu. >> thi
. >> welcome to 60 minutes on cnbc. i'm steve kroft. we live on an increasingly endangered planet, from the glaciers of antarctica to the rich prairie lands of canada. and the ultimate disaster may be financial as well as environmental. later in this episode, scott pelley reports from antarctica on the wide-ranging effects of global warming. and later bob simon has a story from canada on the environmental damage caused by the next great oil rush. but our first story involves a controversial waste product that could have damaging effects on the environment. there are more than 600 coal-fired power plants generating electricity in the u.s., and those plants produce 130 million tons of waste called coal ash. it contains concentrations of mercury, arsenic, lead, and other toxic materials. and as lesley stahl first reported in 2009, when coal ash is dumped into wet ponds--and there are more than 500 of those across the country-- the result can have an enormous health risk on the people living in nearby communities. >> we get about 48%, nearly half of the electricity in this country from coal
are so susceptible to con men. we begin with markopolos. at the beginning of 2009, he sat down with steve kroft for his first television interview. >> kroft: until the end of 2008, harry markopolos was an obscure financial analyst and mildly eccentric fraud investigator from boston who most people would never notice on the street. >> my modern greek hero. how you doing? >> kroft: but today he enjoys an almost heroic status, pursued by journalists and movie producers and honored by colleagues as the man who went to the securities and exchange commission and blew the whistle on bernie madoff and his $50 billion fraud. >> (blows whistle) thank you. thank you. please take your seats. >> kroft: but he seems uncomfortable with all the attention, and knows that he is no hero. >> i stand before you a $50 billion failure. (laughter) >> kroft: how many times did you send material to the sec? >> may 2000, october 2001, october, november, and december of 2005, then again june 2007, and finally april 2008. >> kroft: hmm. >> so five separate sec submissions. >> kroft: and in spite of all of the things
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)